New Features in Office 365 Message Encryption

I have long been interested in encryption. I started off my IT career in the United States Marine Corps where I had a Top-Secret security clearance and frequently worked with classified message traffic. During this time, I learned a lot about the rules of encryption and security. Most of what I learned, however, is that encryption is incredibly hard to do correctly.

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Office 365 Hold Your Own Key

Encryption is hard. There is really no way around that fact.

One of the great benefits of Office 365, or any cloud product, is that these complex solutions are deployed and maintained for you by those who are best qualified to make them work. The downside to having someone else deploy and run your IT solutions is the lack of control you have over your information. You don’t really know who has access to your information when you’re moving it to the cloud.

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Encryption in Exchange Online Part 5

Now that we have the basic three templates working, let’s circle back and talk about that “advanced features” button we saw earlier. In your Office 365 portal go into Admin > Service Settings > Rights Management and select Manage in the center dashboard. You will be redirected to an Azure website (no need to log in again) where you will see a dashboard that looks like this

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Fort Knox: Office 365 encrypted file storage

In Mid-2014 Microsoft introduced a new encryption technology to Office 365 that they code named “Fort Knox”.  Fort Knox is a blob encryption technology that is applied to SharePoint Online and OneDrive for Business, and as I am primarily an Exchange guy I was not really aware of Fort Knox until recently. After taking a look at this technology, I think it is a pretty nifty bit of security that Office 365 customers, and potential Office 365 customers, should know about.

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